How To Treat Patients with Congestive Heart Failure: Disparities in Practice Patterns and Outcomes

Congestive heart failure is a severe condition where the heart cannot regularly pump blood to the rest of the body. This condition can be caused by many factors but is usually linked to high blood pressure and is usually treated in heart hospitals. While it is sometimes reversible, most people suffering from it must undergo heart surgery or receive medication to improve their condition. 

A cardiologist or general physician addresses congestive Heart Failure (CHF). Patients with CHF need to see their doctor regularly. The doctor will prescribe medication, diet restrictions, and exercise modifications. In addition, some patients may need to undergo surgery or get a pacemaker implanted to correct their heartbeat.

Visible Symptoms of Congestive Heart Failure

If you have an enlarged heart, shortness of breath, or swelling in your legs or feet, see a doctor immediately. These symptoms could be the first signs of CHF. Heart failure occurs when the heart is unable to push blood through the body efficiently. This causes fluid to build up in the body, most notably in the lungs and legs. This fluid build-up can restrict movements, tire you out more efficiently, and cause shortness of breath. 

Research suggests that the quality of care for patients hospitalised with heart failure may be improved by efforts to improve physician awareness and the adoption of recommended practice patterns. Also, hospitals can optimize the use of evidence-based therapies and diagnostic and prognostic tools.

Patients admitted to the hospital with congestive heart failure present with similar diagnoses and co-morbidities across specialities. More than two-thirds of patients in each speciality had at least one inadequately controlled Cardio-Vascular Risk Factor (CVRF), and approximately half had anaemia. Subspecialists discharged more patients from heart hospitals with inadequate control of their CVRFs than did primary care providers. They were more likely to discharge patients with primary care attributable anaemia.

Congestive Heart Failure Treatment

The treatment options for congestive heart failure aim at relieving the symptoms and slowing down further damage. The precise treatment plan depends on the type of heart failure, the stage, the patient’s condition, and underlying health conditions. 

  • Medications: The prescribed medications generally include vasodilators, ARB drugs or ACE inhibitors, diuretics and Beta-blockers, among others. 
  • Surgical Procedures: In severe cases of congestive heart failure, doctors recommend bypass surgery to replace heart valves or open blocked arteries. Some patients may even have to get a pacemaker (biventricular pacing therapy) or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The last resort is heart transplantation.  

Patients admitted to the hospital with congestive heart failure have similar diagnoses and co-morbidities across specialities. More than two-thirds of patients in each speciality had at least one inadequately controlled Cardio-Vascular Risk Factor (CVRF), and approximately half had anaemia. 

Subspecialists discharged more patients from heart hospitals with inadequate control of their CVRFs than primary care providers. They were more likely to discharge patients with primary care attributable anaemia.

Congestive Heart Failure Treatment

The treatment options for congestive heart failure aim at relieving the symptoms and slowing down further damage. The precise treatment plan depends on the type of heart failure, the stage, the patient’s condition, and underlying health conditions. 

  • Medications: The prescribed medications generally include vasodilators, ARB drugs or ACE inhibitors, diuretics and Beta-blockers, among others. 
  • Surgical Procedures: In severe cases of congestive heart failure, doctors recommend bypass surgery to replace heart valves or open blocked arteries. Some patients may even have to get a pacemaker (biventricular pacing therapy) or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The last resort is heart transplantation.  

Patients admitted to the hospital with congestive heart failure have similar diagnoses and co-morbidities across specialities. More than two-thirds of patients in each speciality had at least one inadequately controlled Cardio-Vascular Risk Factor (CVRF), and approximately half had anaemia. 

Subspecialists discharged more patients from heart hospitals with inadequate control of their CVRFs than primary care providers. They were more likely to discharge patients with primary care attributable anaemia.

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